The Crosby

 

Contact Us


The Crosby Estate at Rancho Santa Fe Master Association


PO Box 5000, PMB 534
Rancho Santa Fe, CA 92067

18029 Calle Ambiente, Ste. 515
Rancho Santa Fe, CA 92067

Phone: 858.381.5615
Fax: 951.491.6964

http://Crosbyestate.org


Contact Information:

Keystone Pacific Property Management
Onsite Office: (858) 381-5615
Customer Care: (877) 577-6462
Fax: (949) 833-0919
email: cmoulton@keystonepacific.com



Rincon Consultants, Inc.
Attn: John Dreher Jr.

5135 Avenida Encinas, Suite A
Carlsbad, CA 92008

Phone: 760-918-9444
Fax: 760-918-9449

Email: crosby@rinconconsultants.com


   Rincon Consultants

 

Rincon Consultants

NEWS AND INFORMATION


Saturday, May 12, 2018 (9:00 am) Nature Hike


(click for printable version)






Saturday, May 6, 2017 (9:00 am) Take it Outside California! Event


TAKE IT OUTSIDE CALIFORNIA! is an annual event for Californians to get outside and enjoy all the beautiful parks and natural lands our great state has to offer. Rincon Consultants and The San Dieguito River Valley Conservancy invite you to join us as we take an easy/moderate hike through the beautiful Del Dios Gorge to the Lake Hodges Dam (approximately 4.5 miles round-trip). A Wildlife Biologist from Rincon will be on the hike to talk about native plants and wildlife found along the trail and within the gorge.

San Dieguito River Valley Conservancy website link: www.sdrvc.org

Location and Contact Information: Take It Outside California

More information and trail map: http://www.sdrp.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/15.06.24-Trail-Map-Santa-Fe-Valley-Del-Dios-Gorge.pdf






Saturday, April 30, 2016 (9:00 am) Take it Outside California! Event


TAKE IT OUTSIDE CALIFORNIA! is an annual event for Californians to get outside and enjoy all the beautiful parks and natural lands our great state has to offer. Rincon Consultants and The San Dieguito River Valley Conservancy invite you to join us as we take an easy/moderate hike through the beautiful Del Dios Gorge to the Lake Hodges Dam (approximately 4.5 miles round-trip). A Wildlife Biologist from Rincon will be on the hike to talk about native plants and wildlife found along the trail and within the gorge.

San Dieguito River Valley Conservancy website link: www.sdrvc.org

Location: Directions will be provided upon registration

Register: https://form.jotform.com/60624615655154

More information and trail map: http://www.sdrp.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/15.06.24-Trail-Map-Santa-Fe-Valley-Del-Dios-Gorge.pdf






Crosby Habitat Management Summary


El Niño season has come upon us and with it The Crosby at Rancho Santa Fe has received some much needed rain. With the rain, the vernal pools on the Open Space Preserve are filling up with water, and Rincon Biologists are able to conduct focused surveys for San Diego fairy shrimp (Branchinecta sandiegonensis).

Vernal pools are seasonal ponds that support sensitive plants and animals, including fairy shrimp. Because vernal pool species only occur in this particular type of habitat, many of these species are endangered and protected. The Crosby Open Space Preserve has 20 vernal pools that were rebuilt following construction of the Crosby Estates. The San Diego fairy shrimp is a federally endangered, aquatic crustacean generally restricted to vernal pools in coastal southern California and northwestern Baja California, Mexico. San Diego fairy shrimp are usually observed from January to March when seasonal rainfall fill vernal pools and initiate cyst (egg) hatching. The ½ inch to 1 inch long crustaceans only live during the wet season when the pools retain water for a long enough period of time. Under ideal seasonal conditions, they will hatch and develop quickly to breeding age. Then the eggs will settle into the mud to dry out and wait for the next rainy season to hatch. Although these pools have been recorded to support San Diego fairy shrimp in the past, the consecutive years of drought have prevented us from conducting surveys for this species.

By eating the algae and zooplankton in the pools, the fairy shrimp are capturing and concentrating the nutritional value of these lower-level food-chain organisms. The fairy shrimp, in turn, provide a food source for organisms higher on the food-chain, such as the spade foot toad (Spea hammondii) and its larvae. Many bird species also depend on the fairy shrimp as a food source. In consuming algae, fairy shrimp also prevent its overgrowth and are important to the overall ecosystem.

So far, our biologists have only observed juvenile fairy shrimp in the vernal pools, and only adults can be identified to species. However, with the warming trends upon us once again, the pools have dried up. We wait for more rain, with hope that the cute little guys return again and survive into adulthood.

In other news, the on-going effort of invasive plant removal in the area under the Crosby Bridge has had a recent success story. Invasive plants are non-native plants that can pose a serious environmental threat. Even though they make look pretty, they compete with native species for sunlight, moisture, nutrients, and space, eventually wiping out the native plants. Many invasive plants are also more flammable and can become potential fuel for wildfires. Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus sp.), Castor bean (Ricinus communis), and purple pampas grass (Cortaderia jubata) have been targeted for treatment or removal in that area since 2012. As a result, we now have over 150 native coast live oaks (Quercus agrifolia) saplings sprouting throughout the restoration area on the northeastern bank below the Crosby Bridge. Without the aggressive competition from the invasive plants, the native seeds have been allowed a chance to reclaim their space. Coast live oaks are crucial for the native scene and their acorns provide food for over 100 species.

In addition, the sycamore (Platanus racemose) saplings that were planted in 2014 by volunteers and local residents are going strong and have grown 1-2 feet! These efforts increase the probability that native plants will become established and that the restoration efforts will be successful.

We encourage everyone to hike the trail within the Open Space Preserve and enjoy the beautiful scenery. Please remember, you must stay on the trail to avoid impacts to sensitive plants, wildlife, and habitat. Also, keep a look out for our future events to get to know the local plants and wildlife with one of our biologists!





Crosby Habitat Management Summary


Entering the fall season, we would like to recap the highlights of our spring and summer activities at the Crosby.

As part of the Habitat Management Program, Rincon Consultants (Rincon) typically selects a special status species to survey for each year. We started the year off with the hopes that we would receive enough rain to fill the vernal pools within the Open Space Preserve. Vernal pools are ponds that hold water seasonally and support distinct and often special status plants and animals including fairy shrimp. While we received more rain then last year, it was not enough to fill the pools.

We continue to see improvement in the habitats along the San Dieguito River within the Open Space following the Eucalyptus removal from the waterway. There is still work to be done, but riparian plants such as willows (Salix spp.) and mule fat (Baccharis salicifolia) are increasing in acreage. These native plant species provide nesting habitat for threatened and endangered birds such as the least Bell’s vireo (Vireo bellii pusillus) (LBVI) and southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) (SWFL). In July 2015, Rincon Biologist Jennifer Kendrick conducted focused surveys for southwestern willow flycatcher. While no SWFL were detected, one LBVI was detected aurally within the open space preserve. This survey provided baseline data that will inform surveys in the future.

In April, the San Dieguito River Valley Conservancy (SDRVC) and Rincon hosted a volunteer weed removal event at the SDRVC restoration site within the Open Space Preserve.

Volunteers removed non-native and invasive plants such as palms, mustard, and grasses that were choking out the native plants. These efforts increase the probability that native plants will become established and that the restoration efforts will be successful.

Rincon worked with the Crosby Master HOA to develop an informational sign that will be installed along the trail south of the waterline road this fall. The sign details some of the Open Space’s key plants and animals. As we move further into fall, we are preparing for what we hope to be an above average rainy season. While we welcome the rain, Rincon will be monitoring for trail and restoration site erosion, and addressing issues that arise as needed. We encourage everyone to hike the trail within the Open Space Preserve and enjoy the beautiful scenery. Please remember, you must stay on the trail to avoid impacts to sensitive plants, wildlife, and habitat.









Stake Holder News: Restoring the San Dieguito River Habitat


Download the NRCS's Press Release






Collaborating to Enhance The Crosby Open Space Preserve


For the last six years, Rincon biologists have been managing a 170-acre Open Space Preserve (Preserve) adjacent to The Crosby at Rancho Santa Fe Estates in San Diego County. The purpose of The Crosby Habitat Management Program (HMP) is to maximize and maintain the habitat qualities of the Preserve. As the Habitat Manager, Rincon is responsible for overseeing aspects of the management program and reporting annually to San Diego County's HMP Administrator, who has final authority over the Preserve. Rincon's annual management tasks include:

  • Prevention of open space degradation
    • Monthly surveys to monitor the Preserve
    • Removal of existing non-native plants
    • Problem species monitoring/removal
    • Trash removal
    • Fencing and signage
    • Public awareness
  • Vegetation mapping (monitor long-term changes in vegetation communities)
  • Sensitive species surveys/monitoring
  • General biota surveys
  • Community education/meetings, and website management
  • Annual reporting

As one example of Rincon's effectiveness in enhancing the Preserve, Rincon has been collaborating with the non-profit San Dieguito River Valley Conservancy (SDRVC) on efforts to restore the San Dieguito River segment that runs through the Preserve. Starting in 2010, SDRVC removed invasive eucalyptus trees along the River, and reached the Preserve trailhead parking lot in 2013 before funding ran out. Eucalyptus trees grow quickly, taking over rivers and waterways, and preventing native plant species from growing. Since the first trees were removed in 2010, we have already seen the native Southern Willow Scrub vegetation community return. This year, Rincon is helping SDRVC continue its eucalyptus removal by collaborating with the USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) to explore potential grant funding opportunities. This could also allow the removal of additional invasive species or the enhancement of wetland habitat in the Preserve.

Information on the Preserve can be found on our Open Space Preserve Page. Learn about the SDRVC at http://sdrvc.org/ and the NRCS conservation programs at their website. As we head into spring 2013, Rincon is planning on collaborating with SDRVC to set up trail hikes and volunteer restoration events, so stay tuned for more information!





Volunteer Habitat Restoration Event and Hike


Get outdoors and hike the Santa Fe Valley portion of the Coast to Crest Trail that traverses the Open Space Preserve. Hosted by the San Dieguito River Valley Conservancy and Rincon Consultants, the event will provide interested parties an opportunity to learn about the natural history of the Open Space and Habitat Management Program. See flyer for more information.





Del Dios Gorge Riparian Restoration Project


The San Dieguito River Park Conservancy began the next phase of a riparian restoration project in Del Dios Gorge the week of November 14, 2011. The work is funded through a grant from the California Natural Resources Agency’s River Parkways program received in 2010 for enhancements to the River Park’s Coast-to-Crest Trail. Planned work includes the removal of eucalyptus and other non-native species along the San Dieguito River in Del Dios Gorge, east of Rancho Santa Fe.  The funds will also allow revegetation with native riparian trees and shrubs to restore habitat for birds and pollinators. Click on the Fact Sheet or visit www.sdrp.org for more information.





Invasive Species Management


Non-native plants have far-reaching effects when they invade native vegetation communities. Many invasive species effectively out-compete native plants, degrade water quality, increase the risk of flooding, alter flow regimes and provide little or no value to wildlife. Rincon is working with the San Dieguito River Park and other agencies to combat invasives throughout the San Dieguito Watershed. You can help us locate invasive species by downloading the free What’s Invasive! mobile application to your smartphone.





Habitat Management Plan Annual Report


The Crosby at Rancho Santa Fe Habitat Management Plan 2010 Annunal Report is now available.  This report describes the habitat management activities that took place within the open space during 2010, including invasive species removal, sensitive species monitoring, erosion control, and habitat restoration.





Volunteer Work Days


Volunteer Planting
  Volunteer planting hosted by the SDRVC in HMA-3 (1/3/10)

The San Dieguito River Valley Conservancy periodically hosts volunteer work parties for habitat restoration and invasive weed removal within The Crosby Open Space Preserve.  For those interested in lending a hand, please visit the Conservancy’s website.


 

 

 

National Trail's Day – Each year events are held to help promote awareness of the wide variety of benefits that trails provide, to encourage people to discover their local trails, and to raise awareness of trail issues. If you enjoy hiking, biking, and/or horseback riding along the Santa Fe Valley Trail, please join The San Dieguito River Valley Conservatory and Rincon Consultants on Saturday, June 2, 2012 to help maintain one of your favorite trail systems.





Community Hike


The Crosby Habitat Management Program will host a community nature hike on April 28, 2012 to celebrate National Park Week (April 21-29). Get outdoors and hike the Santa Fe Valley portion of the Coast to Crest Trail, which traverses the Open Space Preserve. The hike will be led by the San Dieguito River Valley Conservancy and Rincon Consultants, and will provide interested parties an opportunity to learn about the natural history of the Open Space and the Habitat Management Program, and get some morning exercise. Bring binoculars, as this will also be a great opportunity to see spring migration of both riparian and upland birds. For more information on the trail, please visit the San Dieguito River Park Joint Powers Authority website.

Note: Volunteer work days and hikes are hosted entirely by the San Dieguito River Valley Conservancy and other entities and are not Rincon-sponsored events.





Witch Creek Fire


In 2007, the Witch Creek Fire burned approximately 6,000 acres from Ramona to Rancho Santa Fe. No structural losses occurred within The Crosby community but the fire caused significant damage to bridges and fencing along the Santa Fe Valley portion of the Coast to Crest Trail. This infrastructure has been rebuilt and the trail has reopened. While the majority of the Open Space Preserve was burned, critical stands of habitat remained to support surviving wildlife, and the vegetation has substantially recovered. Future concerns with the Open Space Preserve include erosion and invasive species control.

November 2007
  November 2007

 

August 2008
  August 2008

For more details regarding wildfire preparedness or addition fire protection resources, please visit the Rancho Santa Fe Fire Protection District website.